Notes

Joe Chiodo - News From the Net

1. Mashable

With voting season quickly approaching, we’ll soon be heading to the polls.  And those polls, in many places, hav remained somewhat, well, “old-fashioned.”  But in Mashable’s '6 Apps You Don't Want to Miss' article they show us one app that puts a modern spin on voting. AT&T’s VoterHub App doesn’t exactly let you vote from your phone, but it does give you all the other voting/election knowledge you could ever need right in the palm of your hand.  The app was just recently launched, check it out: 

What it does:

  • Shows how to register to vote in your state
  • how to find the nearest polling place
  • provides sample ballots
  • gives candidate info
  • allows political debate/argument with users through nearly all 
  • BUT — only available on Android right now.  Don’t worry though, iOS is on the way

Check out a slideshow of the App Here!

2. Gizmodo

Speaking of a modern twist…how about modernizing something that’s already pretty modern.  A Gizmodo article shows us some not-so-well-known tricks to take your google chroming experience to a whole new level.  Almost everyone, or at least everyone I know uses Chrome — so these tips may come in handy.  Or at least make your life a little easier for a while.  Here are two of the tips I had no idea existed:

  • Chrome in Split | View.  I hate jumping back and forth between tabs…but this article teaches you how to have one window with two tabs open at the same time.  Pretty much PIP (picture in Picture) for browsing.  Pretty cool.
  • SOCIAL MEDIA SOLUTION: I always hate instagramming a picture and sending it to facebook and twitter….knowing that most of my followers follow me on each of these accounts.  So, chrome, solved that problem.  It’s called Buffer, and it spaces out something you want to share over the course of the day.  So when you hit share, it may post to Twitter in the morning, Facebook in the afternoon, and Instagram at night.  

3. Mediashift

This mediashift article gives us a little insight as to where our presidential candidates stand in the online/social media world.  The article dives deep into how much the two candidates use social media and the public perception of their online presence.  The most surprising thing I found … Romney’s Twitter usage compared to Obama’s: 1 to 17 a day.  It shocked me that it wasn’t equal as this would be easy to stay on top of, and surely help get votes and change opinions of voters heavily indulged in social media.  Here’s a graph I pulled from the article:

Notes

Stacy Ike- Let’s talk about news… from the net!

1. MEDIA BISTRO

From Twitter’s Headquarters, Data-Driven Best Practices For Journalists

We have been talking about the power of Twitter for quite sometime now but I thought this article laid out and pretty much confirmed everything we have been taught in #JenClass.

The basic rules which everyone “says” they know but always forget to use are:

1.Tweet your beat and tweet it live

2. Use Hashtags for context (I forget this like everyday)

3. @Cite your sources

4. Share what you’re reading.

I thought it was going to be easy for me to point out one of the recommendations are especially important, but I think all of them strongly contribute to the power of Twitter. Especially as a journalist, it is so important to cite your sources and use #hashtags for almost everything. Sharing what you are reading is a great one too because it let’s people know what you are interested in and the stories you tweet can hopefully inform other tweeters about the latest news. You really have to check this article out, and see the list of recommendations with an example on Twitter’s blog. 

2. ENGADGET

I mostly was drawn to this article because it was the only thing NOT talking about the IPHONE. It looks like the 7.5 update for Android adds smart page for social and news updates. I like this because, well, I have an Android and I am always trying to figure how to get my news faster. Now, since the articles says that the news is generated from the most frequent sites the first thing I thought about is “how do I contribute to getting information out to my viewers?” Answer is….be present online! For instance, if I am constantly tweeting, hashtaging, retweeting, etc. than when this new smart page looks at the most frequently viewed pages (which means Twitter is inevitably on that list), things that I as a journalist will be apart of that news feed because I am constantly present in that space. Try it out for at least a month, you won’t be sorry. 

3. CYBERJOURNALIST 

I am a lover of LinkedIn so when I came across this article I initially thought, “wow, it’s almost time for us to officially switch from Facebook to LinkedIn,” and then I thought how much I would hate that. I am only saying that because LinkedIn is a place where you can be connected with your boss and best friend (just like FB). In my head, it’s an avenue for me to get a job, but this article says if you target the right people, you can gain overall followers. #ListenUp #TakeSomeNotes

FOUR THINGS NEWS ORGANIZATIONS CAN LEARN FROM LINKEDIN:

1. Be Targeted

2. Be focused

3. Be interactive

4. Be viral

Overall, i’m actually really excited to see how different journalism platforms decide to use LinkedIn to their benefit. 

4. I just thought this article was funny. The IPHONE has only been out for just a few days and already people have something to say. #FirstWorldProblems 

53 Notes

breakingnews:

iPhone 5 preorders top 2 million in first 24 hours
CNET: Apple says the iPhone 5 got more than 2 million preorders in its first 24 hours, doubling last year’s 4S launch. Apple says demand exceeded the initial supply. While a majority of orders will be fulfilled on Sept. 21, the company says many are scheduled to be delivered in October.
Photo: The iPhone 5 is seen next to an iPhone 4S. (James Martin / CNET)

Did you order yours?

breakingnews:

iPhone 5 preorders top 2 million in first 24 hours

CNET: Apple says the iPhone 5 got more than 2 million preorders in its first 24 hours, doubling last year’s 4S launch. Apple says demand exceeded the initial supply. While a majority of orders will be fulfilled on Sept. 21, the company says many are scheduled to be delivered in October.

Photo: The iPhone 5 is seen next to an iPhone 4S. (James Martin / CNET)

Did you order yours?

Notes

Kayleigh Milas - News from the Net

1. MASHABLE

Facebook Boosts Voter Turnout

Mashable discusses an experiment on the effect of Facebook posts on voter turnout. The results weren’t that surprising. People are more likely to pay attention to something if their friends are paying attention to it too—so why wouldn’t it be the same when it comes to politics? When scrolling through your Facebook newsfeed, what do you find yourself checking out the most? The post with the most likes and comments. We naturally want to be a part of the conversation and be in the know. We don’t want to be left out.

The research group that saw the number of people who clicked the “I voted” button was more likely to look for places to vote. Social networking peer pressure captured interest. It’s research like this that shows news stations should continue to communicate on social media and encourage others to be a part of it. The more people we get talking and paying attention, the more information we get from our audience and the bigger the variety. It’s also something to keep in mind come election time.

2. ALL THINGS D

And Now a Word from Our Sponsors: Please Don’t Pick Up Your iPhone!

It’s bad news for advertisers but possibly good news for us. A graph on the site shows most people pick up their phones at the top of a commercial break. While that means they’re not paying attention to what our advertisers are trying to see, it does mean they’re checking out the internet and social media.

I’m no social media guru by any means, but I think news stations could look into having someone be in charge of checking out tweets and Facebook posts at the top of a commercial break to see what viewers are talking about—whether it be something about the news or not. We could also be using that as a prime opportunity to do most of our posting when we know most of the TV audience will see it.

3. MEDIA BISTRO

Photo/Video Sharing Habits 

A bar graph on Media Bistro had surprising results. A Pew Study on photo/video sharing habits on social media websites shows more people are actually using LinkedIn than Twitter. Is there some way we can target our news audience through LinkedIn?

LinkedIn is obviously a place for professionals, so a news station would not try to reach out to a younger audience there. And it’s interesting to see the small percentage of people using Tumblr compared to the number using Pintrest and Instagram. I’m still not certain how we can get news across to people through Pintrest, but I think we should try to push Instagram if we can figure out a way to keep the coverage constant. We can’t just post one good picture a week and only use it again when something eye-catching comes along. 

Notes

Cody LaGrow-News of the Net

1. LOST REMOTE

Social Media Drives Younger Viewers to TV

I read the headline and thought, “Cool. Not surprised. Annoying teenagers love to rant about every detail of their lives.”

But the further you read, you see that people as old as 34 participated in the survey. Equally interesting, this survey is parallel to several others that look to answer who is online talking about television. 

The article made me ponder questions about social media’s relationship with news broadcasts, entertainment television and advertisement. In reference to U_News, I began to analyze the show’s concept and how a news program can attempt to engage a younger audience.

2. MASHABLE  

How Small Businesses Should Use Hashtags

Tweeting smarter seems to be a topic for users in the Twitterverse, especially those of us in journalism.

One hundred sixty characters do not always say everything you’d like, so the people of Mashable offer some tips for small businesses. And since a journalist is his or her own business, the tips still apply.

1. Seek business-specific conversation

2. Keep it simple and consistent

3. Create your own hashtag

4.  Organize social dashboards by hashtag

5. Take advantage of Follow Friday

As a journalist, I think we should focus on number two, three and five. I’m now even thinking of adding #CodyReports or #CodyConcludes or #COCOsoLOCO to my news-related tweets in an attempt to generate a following.

 Number five is also very important. While spending my time at a network this summer, executives always pushed on-air talent to tweet back at those who tweet them. It makes the viewer feel appreciated and makes them a dedicated viewer.

3. GIZMODO

How to make a GIF

Have you ever loved something so much while not really knowing how to operate it?

Very similar to the dust-covered Ab Lounge in my apartment, I have a love for the humor that Tumblr provides without knowing how to do it myself. It’s the main reason I took #jenclass because I wanted to impress McKayla Maroney.

Read this article. ‘Tis very informative. Buy PhotoShop…or a black market version of PhotoShop.

However, I question how valuable GIFs are for things not meant to be humorous. Could they be applied to hard news? The jury is still out.

 Perhaps they could be used as a technique for story promotion.

1 Notes

I took a look at Jen’s list of suggested sites for the ‘News From the Net presentation, but I decided to go do some of my own technology site research. I found three really cool sites that seem to have good things going on.
1 The Verge 
This site covers mostly product review, but I found it also does a lot of live blogging. They live blog and tweet technology conferences while they’re happening. That way, if a major mobile operating system like Android is coming out with a new product, consumers can learn every aspect of what the product has to offer without going to the conference or reading an overview later that day.
This is not just a great site to learn about products, but it also carries valuable technology news. They have reporters who cover big technology stories—like most recently topics revolving the Apple vs. Samsung case.
They also covered Facebook stock and Facebook buying out Instagram.  To relate to a younger audience –and in an attempt to cover something outside new technology—they have their staff write about books, music, movies, etc.  
 
2 Engadget 
The thing I love the most about Engadget is their Podcasts. They talk about the latest news and weather (fluffy news), but they leave room for Q&A about latest technologies. Their latest podcast talked about the media’s influence on people’s opinions about news and how opinions about new products can be swayed just by “what people have heard” about it. Very interesting to listen to if you’re in the car and it’s easily accessible through iTunes, mp3, RSS, Zune.


3 Social Media Today 
This site is a lot more newsy than the other technology sites I have been to. It is less product driven and more focused on conversations surrounding social media. There is a really interesting post about new options for Facebook pages that have accumulated over 5,000 likes. They can now target viewers based on age, gender, language, and location. This option will be really helpful for advertisers. 
They also have articles that compare sites and what they offer. This article argues Pinterest is the uncreative version of Tumblr.
It’s a great read if you’re considering whether or not to open an account with either site.
All in all—liked this site the most out of all the ones I looked at, because I am less into upcoming products and more interested in hot topics and new social media sites.


4 Techcrunch 
Out of the sites Jen posted, I liked this one the most. They have really cool articles about products and sites (like the others), but they break everything up based on topic. An entire column is solely devoted to Apple, Facebook, Twitter, Google, and Android news. That is really helpful, because a reader can be up-to-date on every story surrounding the biggest companies without having to look in multiple places to find it.
I also found this amazing article about women in the technology field. It shows the field is optimistic about what women can offer, and that makes me smile :)

I took a look at Jen’s list of suggested sites for the ‘News From the Net presentation, but I decided to go do some of my own technology site research. I found three really cool sites that seem to have good things going on.

The Verge 

This site covers mostly product review, but I found it also does a lot of live blogging. They live blog and tweet technology conferences while they’re happening. That way, if a major mobile operating system like Android is coming out with a new product, consumers can learn every aspect of what the product has to offer without going to the conference or reading an overview later that day.

This is not just a great site to learn about products, but it also carries valuable technology news. They have reporters who cover big technology stories—like most recently topics revolving the Apple vs. Samsung case.

They also covered Facebook stock and Facebook buying out Instagram.  To relate to a younger audience –and in an attempt to cover something outside new technology—they have their staff write about books, music, movies, etc.  

 

Engadget 

The thing I love the most about Engadget is their Podcasts. They talk about the latest news and weather (fluffy news), but they leave room for Q&A about latest technologies. Their latest podcast talked about the media’s influence on people’s opinions about news and how opinions about new products can be swayed just by “what people have heard” about it. Very interesting to listen to if you’re in the car and it’s easily accessible through iTunes, mp3, RSS, Zune.

Social Media Today 

This site is a lot more newsy than the other technology sites I have been to. It is less product driven and more focused on conversations surrounding social media. There is a really interesting post about new options for Facebook pages that have accumulated over 5,000 likes. They can now target viewers based on age, gender, language, and location. This option will be really helpful for advertisers. 

They also have articles that compare sites and what they offer. This article argues Pinterest is the uncreative version of Tumblr.

It’s a great read if you’re considering whether or not to open an account with either site.

All in all—liked this site the most out of all the ones I looked at, because I am less into upcoming products and more interested in hot topics and new social media sites.

Techcrunch 

Out of the sites Jen posted, I liked this one the most. They have really cool articles about products and sites (like the others), but they break everything up based on topic. An entire column is solely devoted to Apple, Facebook, Twitter, Google, and Android news. That is really helpful, because a reader can be up-to-date on every story surrounding the biggest companies without having to look in multiple places to find it.

I also found this amazing article about women in the technology field. It shows the field is optimistic about what women can offer, and that makes me smile :)

Notes

Class visit: Joy Mayer

Here’s an article that explains more about what Joy Mayer did during her Reynolds Journalism Institute fellowship and is extending it into her work at the Missourian.

Notes

Instagram as a news source

I’m curious to hear what the class thinks about the explosion of Instagram sources during the Empire State shooting. Read this article… Is an Instagram photo worth the price?

15 Notes

futurejournalismproject:

fjp-latinamerica:

LibreBus to roam South America
The LibreBus Project was born last year in Central America aiming to foster a new dialogue among open-software communities scattered throughout the region, in order for them to share relevant experiences and amplify their networks. The touring bus roamed through Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala, making constant stops to also chat with locals about open software and freedom of expression, among other topics. Here is a documentary video of the whole journey.
Now, the second edition of the project is about to take place in South America: 5000 miles in 5 weeks, following a route that starts in southern Chile and then goes on to Argentina, Uruguay, and Paraguay. This time, the producers revamped the core concepts of the project and the one on Freedom of Expression specifically caught our attention:

The massive incorporation of ICTs into civic life has permitted an expansion and enhancement of the possibilities for people to turn themselves into producers and broadcasters of information. At this moment, we exercise our freedom of expression across multiple virtual media, such as blogs and social networking sites, and we also use numerous virtual tools to coordinate and organize plans and strategies for activism. Nonetheless, we can see that our freedom of expression on the internet is constantly under threat, whether from corporate interests which want to interfere with network neutrality, or various laws which –under the pretext of cybersecurity, or crackdowns on piracy or pedophilia– seek to exercise control and record every citizen’s activities on the network. 

Bonus: You can follow all day-to-day activities of @librebus on Twitter.
Image: LibreBus 2012 logo, via LibreBus.

FJP: Love this project. — Michael

This is super cool to see… mainly because I had a chance to brainstorm the idea of an engagement bus back during a workshop led by Joy Mayer in May 2011. Check out some of the details Joy presented last year.

futurejournalismproject:

fjp-latinamerica:

LibreBus to roam South America

The LibreBus Project was born last year in Central America aiming to foster a new dialogue among open-software communities scattered throughout the region, in order for them to share relevant experiences and amplify their networks. The touring bus roamed through Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala, making constant stops to also chat with locals about open software and freedom of expression, among other topics. Here is a documentary video of the whole journey.

Now, the second edition of the project is about to take place in South America: 5000 miles in 5 weeks, following a route that starts in southern Chile and then goes on to Argentina, Uruguay, and Paraguay. This time, the producers revamped the core concepts of the project and the one on Freedom of Expression specifically caught our attention:

The massive incorporation of ICTs into civic life has permitted an expansion and enhancement of the possibilities for people to turn themselves into producers and broadcasters of information. At this moment, we exercise our freedom of expression across multiple virtual media, such as blogs and social networking sites, and we also use numerous virtual tools to coordinate and organize plans and strategies for activism. Nonetheless, we can see that our freedom of expression on the internet is constantly under threat, whether from corporate interests which want to interfere with network neutrality, or various laws which –under the pretext of cybersecurity, or crackdowns on piracy or pedophilia– seek to exercise control and record every citizen’s activities on the network. 

Bonus: You can follow all day-to-day activities of @librebus on Twitter.

Image: LibreBus 2012 logo, via LibreBus.

FJP: Love this project. — Michael

This is super cool to see… mainly because I had a chance to brainstorm the idea of an engagement bus back during a workshop led by Joy Mayer in May 2011. Check out some of the details Joy presented last year.

49 Notes

futurejournalismproject:

I Can Haz Job?
The Cheezburger Network, which includes sites such as I Can Has Cheezburger?, FAIL Blog, Memebase, and The Daily What, has a full-time Reporter/Moderator position open in its Seattle offices.
What would you do? Scour the Web for kittehs, of course.
Via Cheezburger:

We try to look at the world a little differently, with an open mind and a desire to test new ideas and take risks. We’re serious about making the world a happier place and that starts with a results-focused environment. We work hard and have a lot of fun when we succeed…
…We’re inventing as we go along. We need people who constantly think about changing the world to be a better place and have the ambition to do it.

Interested? Apply here.

Now this is a cool job opportunity.

futurejournalismproject:

I Can Haz Job?

The Cheezburger Network, which includes sites such as I Can Has Cheezburger?, FAIL Blog, Memebase, and The Daily What, has a full-time Reporter/Moderator position open in its Seattle offices.

What would you do? Scour the Web for kittehs, of course.

Via Cheezburger:

We try to look at the world a little differently, with an open mind and a desire to test new ideas and take risks. We’re serious about making the world a happier place and that starts with a results-focused environment. We work hard and have a lot of fun when we succeed…

…We’re inventing as we go along. We need people who constantly think about changing the world to be a better place and have the ambition to do it.

Interested? Apply here.

Now this is a cool job opportunity.