Posts tagged Social media

Notes

Stacy Ike: News on the net

1. Instagram Info (Media Bistro)

During our last class (at Jen’s adorable house!) I expressed my concerns with Instagram moving to an online profile so you can imagine my face when I saw this post on Media Bistro referencing the Instagram Blog and their announcement of the profile along with the benefits; perfect timing. 

This is an example of what the online profile looks like:

The author of the article says initially, he was not happy about the collaboration between mobile and web (which I agreered with) but then he listed a few reasons this would help news organizations, I was intrigued. 

1. News organizations can now display a full gallery instead of just one snapshot. Viewers want to feel like they are a part of the story but when you Instagram a photo, it stays in one medium, the phone. If viewers are without a phone, or at least a phone that does not have certain capabilities, they feel disconnected from the story. 

2. Viewer engagement:

"Leading users to exploring more content can lead to three desired outcomes: likes, comments and shares."

3. And finally, this is also a way for viewers to participate in a monetary way. According to the article, ”we all know these social platforms are all about reaching audiences and building communities,  there are monetary gains news organizations take from these networks, and Instagram may soon be able to provide these types of opportunities for brands on the Web.”

2. Ad Age

Ad Question: How can Brands Best Plug In to the Social-Media Revolution?

This article focuses on the idea behind strategic marketing. The author gives some great examples about how she conveyed to many different people (from a cab driver to a business CEO) the importance of branding yourself and using technology to do it for you. 

The main thing I got from this article was to Be ValuableIt’s like what the #JENCLASS social media group is trying to do for our anchors.  People want to know what we are up to as a station so we have to be there. We have to be available, accessible, and transparent. 

3. CyberJournalist 

Cyberjournalist featured  Social Media Today in an article about the hit Korean new song, "Gangnam Style." The question the article focuses on the question, “HOW DID GANGNAM STYLE GO VIRAL?” 

This is particularly interesting because this song has attracted SO much attention from a wide range of people that one must wonder, what tools were used to promote this song?

This video explains the strategy behind this song and the importance of building a solid platform online and in the overall media. 

61 Notes

journo-geekery:

futuristgerd:

(via Facebook now ‘critical’ to online news traffic, says Pew study)

Details:

According to the study, Facebook alone drives up to 8 percent of traffic to some of the Internet’s top news sites. In turn, users are leaving these sites to go to Facebook, which the researchers say is an indication that the Facebook Share buttons provided on many news stories (like this one) are working.
While this may sound impressive, Facebook currently remains well behind the top three traffic drivers, which include Google, the Drudge Report and Yahoo. According to Pew, these “three sites ever account for more than 10 percent of the traffic to any one [major news website].”

Emphasis mine.  Those clicks to-from Facebook are tracked—why are social network referral stats only as solid as an “indication”?   Isn’t that skipping the (well-trod) question of whether there’s long-term value to such traffic?  I’m sure neither FB or news orgs wanting to share official statistics, especially with recent declines.  The growth of Facebook as a news referrer has a lot to do with the prominence of shared news in their frequently adjusted News Feed algorithm.  That—along with certain content themes like Entertainment news—drives the majority of the referral patterns I’ve seen over the past three years or more.  Facebook’s pace over other social sites is more a factor of its size and—until recently—its choice to strongly promote news in their Feed mix. 
Do those readers stick around?  Do the read more news once they arrive at a news site?  Anecdotally, the data I know is that they don’t.  A popular social network news story is either headline snacking or an isolated spike.
“Critical” is a very strong term for mere indicators—I’m reading through the full report today.  I’ll amend this if the headline, pulled quote and chart above (one of many) is backed up with a deeper investigation into social referral value to news orgs.

journo-geekery:

futuristgerd:

(via Facebook now ‘critical’ to online news traffic, says Pew study)

Details:

According to the study, Facebook alone drives up to 8 percent of traffic to some of the Internet’s top news sites. In turn, users are leaving these sites to go to Facebook, which the researchers say is an indication that the Facebook Share buttons provided on many news stories (like this one) are working.

While this may sound impressive, Facebook currently remains well behind the top three traffic drivers, which include Google, the Drudge Report and Yahoo. According to Pew, these “three sites ever account for more than 10 percent of the traffic to any one [major news website].”

Emphasis mine.  Those clicks to-from Facebook are tracked—why are social network referral stats only as solid as an “indication”?   Isn’t that skipping the (well-trod) question of whether there’s long-term value to such traffic?  I’m sure neither FB or news orgs wanting to share official statistics, especially with recent declines.  The growth of Facebook as a news referrer has a lot to do with the prominence of shared news in their frequently adjusted News Feed algorithm.  That—along with certain content themes like Entertainment news—drives the majority of the referral patterns I’ve seen over the past three years or more.  Facebook’s pace over other social sites is more a factor of its size and—until recently—its choice to strongly promote news in their Feed mix. 

Do those readers stick around?  Do the read more news once they arrive at a news site?  Anecdotally, the data I know is that they don’t.  A popular social network news story is either headline snacking or an isolated spike.

“Critical” is a very strong term for mere indicators—I’m reading through the full report today.  I’ll amend this if the headline, pulled quote and chart above (one of many) is backed up with a deeper investigation into social referral value to news orgs.

15 Notes

Notes

3 Notes

There were several behind-closed-door discussions and back-and-forth emails about my Twitter methods, the sort of language I’d use in certain tweets, the frequency at which tweets went out and whether or not it was acceptable to mention or tweet competitors. In responding to the criticism, I made sure to let my managers know that I thought their viewpoints were valid, but I never suggested that I agreed with them.

Excerpt from a blog post I’m working on, which I hope to have done later today, on how my Twitter influence sharply fell at one job, then quickly rose at another. The above was describing my time at the ABC affiliate in San Francisco.

Look for the blog entry to land here later today.

(via producermatthew)

——————-
Matthew is speaking in our class on Monday - And we may ask him a question or two about his experience working social media for a broadcast newsroom.

1 Notes

Yup… it’s another infographic. This one has a bunch of fun statistics thanks to Bit Rebels. Check it out.

Yup… it’s another infographic. This one has a bunch of fun statistics thanks to Bit Rebels. Check it out.

60 Notes

The FJP: Ten Social Media Tips of 2012 from Brian Solis

You’re going to hear me discuss Brian Solis during class this semester. It can’t hurt to learn a bit from him ahead of time.

futurejournalismproject:

Ten Social Media Tips

In 2012, consider yourself a digital anthropologist or sociologist as you immerse yourself in a day in the life of your connected consumer and seek to close the chasm between you and them.

There are many professional social media analysts, researchers and strategists…