Posts tagged journalism

Notes

Stacy Ike: News on the net

1. Instagram Info (Media Bistro)

During our last class (at Jen’s adorable house!) I expressed my concerns with Instagram moving to an online profile so you can imagine my face when I saw this post on Media Bistro referencing the Instagram Blog and their announcement of the profile along with the benefits; perfect timing. 

This is an example of what the online profile looks like:

The author of the article says initially, he was not happy about the collaboration between mobile and web (which I agreered with) but then he listed a few reasons this would help news organizations, I was intrigued. 

1. News organizations can now display a full gallery instead of just one snapshot. Viewers want to feel like they are a part of the story but when you Instagram a photo, it stays in one medium, the phone. If viewers are without a phone, or at least a phone that does not have certain capabilities, they feel disconnected from the story. 

2. Viewer engagement:

"Leading users to exploring more content can lead to three desired outcomes: likes, comments and shares."

3. And finally, this is also a way for viewers to participate in a monetary way. According to the article, ”we all know these social platforms are all about reaching audiences and building communities,  there are monetary gains news organizations take from these networks, and Instagram may soon be able to provide these types of opportunities for brands on the Web.”

2. Ad Age

Ad Question: How can Brands Best Plug In to the Social-Media Revolution?

This article focuses on the idea behind strategic marketing. The author gives some great examples about how she conveyed to many different people (from a cab driver to a business CEO) the importance of branding yourself and using technology to do it for you. 

The main thing I got from this article was to Be ValuableIt’s like what the #JENCLASS social media group is trying to do for our anchors.  People want to know what we are up to as a station so we have to be there. We have to be available, accessible, and transparent. 

3. CyberJournalist 

Cyberjournalist featured  Social Media Today in an article about the hit Korean new song, "Gangnam Style." The question the article focuses on the question, “HOW DID GANGNAM STYLE GO VIRAL?” 

This is particularly interesting because this song has attracted SO much attention from a wide range of people that one must wonder, what tools were used to promote this song?

This video explains the strategy behind this song and the importance of building a solid platform online and in the overall media. 

1 Notes

33 Notes

futurejournalismproject:

Employment in journalism has plummeted to levels by seen since the halcyon days of the early 1990s. Compiled from data gathered by the American Society of News Editors, the chart above shows newsroom staff in 2011 dropped to levels not seen in the U.S. since 1978.

Newspapers now employ 40,600 editors and reporters vs. a peak of 56,900 in the pre-Internet year of 1990, according to the census released today. Thus, newsroom headcount has fallen by 28.6% from its modern-day high.

Granted, there’s nothing particularly newsworthy about the decline of newspaper staff. And there is one bright spot. The ASNE data collection project began to track the number of journalist of color who were working at papers across the U.S. In 1979 just 3.6 percent of reporters were people of color compared to 12.3 percent in 2011. While this figure lags well behind the overall racial diversity of the American populace, it’s an indication that more than technology has changed in newsrooms.
Also not included in he data are journalism jobs at online-only shops like Gawker or Aol’s cornucopia of Internet media properties such as Huffpo and Patch. While not enough to offset industry-wide decline, there are thousands of modern journalists working full time whose last chance to see their name in print was likely time spent working for the college rag.
H/T PBS MediaShift

Interesting info. Check it out.

futurejournalismproject:

Employment in journalism has plummeted to levels by seen since the halcyon days of the early 1990s. Compiled from data gathered by the American Society of News Editors, the chart above shows newsroom staff in 2011 dropped to levels not seen in the U.S. since 1978.

Newspapers now employ 40,600 editors and reporters vs. a peak of 56,900 in the pre-Internet year of 1990, according to the census released today. Thus, newsroom headcount has fallen by 28.6% from its modern-day high.

Granted, there’s nothing particularly newsworthy about the decline of newspaper staff. And there is one bright spot. The ASNE data collection project began to track the number of journalist of color who were working at papers across the U.S. In 1979 just 3.6 percent of reporters were people of color compared to 12.3 percent in 2011. While this figure lags well behind the overall racial diversity of the American populace, it’s an indication that more than technology has changed in newsrooms.

Also not included in he data are journalism jobs at online-only shops like Gawker or Aol’s cornucopia of Internet media properties such as Huffpo and Patch. While not enough to offset industry-wide decline, there are thousands of modern journalists working full time whose last chance to see their name in print was likely time spent working for the college rag.

H/T PBS MediaShift

Interesting info. Check it out.

7 Notes


In an effort to keep you up to date on opportunities to learn outside of class, check out this conference: Based on a True Story; the intersections of documentary film and journalismThe event runs February 29-March 2
Here are details:"An interdisciplinary group of scholars at the University of Missouri––sponsored by the Mizzou Advantage Program — has partnered with the True/False Film Festival to continue a tradition of light-hearted yet serious-minded discussion about documentary film. Conference attendees will spend two days engaging with some of the top thinkers, purveyors, and practitioners of documentary film. (The perfect warm-up to the ninth annual True/False Film Festival, March 1-4, 2012!)"

In an effort to keep you up to date on opportunities to learn outside of class, check out this conference: Based on a True Story; the intersections of documentary film and journalism
The event runs February 29-March 2

Here are details:
"An interdisciplinary group of scholars at the University of Missouri––sponsored by the Mizzou Advantage Program — has partnered with the True/False Film Festival to continue a tradition of light-hearted yet serious-minded discussion about documentary film. Conference attendees will spend two days engaging with some of the top thinkers, purveyors, and practitioners of documentary film. (The perfect warm-up to the ninth annual True/False Film Festival, March 1-4, 2012!)"

29 Notes

He drives a ship like a Ferrari. He was reckless.

A crew member of the doomed Costa Concordia tells reporters near the crash site of the daredevil ways of Capt. Francesco Schettino.

Bonus: Check out this awesome wrap page of all the Costa Concordia reports our journalist-on-the-ground, Barbie Latza Nadeau, is filing.

(via newsweek)

144 Notes

Here’s something to watch:

reuters:

Introducing, Reuters TV.

Reuters today announced the launch of Reuters TV, a new YouTube channel featuring 10 news, commentary and analysis programs covering hard news, finance, politics, technology and special Reuters investigations.

The programming, which will appear on Reuters.com and on Reuters redesigned YouTube channel, marks Reuters entry into the rapidly growing business of online video programming, in partnership with one of the biggest players in next-generation TV, YouTube.

Reuters is employing a creative editing style that is suited for Internet programming and does not mimic traditional TV. “This deal with YouTube gives Reuters a way to showcase our collection of talented journalists and compelling video from around the world” said Dan Colarusso, Reuters global head of programming. “It will offer unique insights and images that other media companies simply can’t match”

Reuters is the biggest news provider among the nearly 100 partners YouTube is working with as it creates original Internet-based programming and reinvents itself as a channel-based video site. The new shows were developed by television news veteran and Reuters global executive producer Barclay Palmer.

They highlight a high-energy, high-quality production style that is unique to any business news broadcasts on traditional television. The 10 programs will feature highly produced reports and commentary from many of Reuters award-winning, nearly 3,000 journalists around the world:

  • Reuters Investigates, featuring investigative journalism and special reports from around the world, in coordination with Reuters award-winning Enterprise unit;
  • The Trail, with Reuters political reporters covering the presidential candidates on the campaign trail;
  • Felix TV, with Reuters finance blogger Felix Salmon, named by Time magazine one of the Top 25 financial bloggers;
  • Media Bite, featuring Peter Lauria, editor of technology, media & telecommunications, and his team of reporters covering a media world experiencing massive change;
  • Tech Tonic, with Anthony De Rosa, Reuters Digital’s social media editor, dubbed by The New York Times “the undisputed king of Tumblr”;
  • Freeland File, with Reuters Digital editor Chrystia Freeland interviewing top newsmakers;
  • Fast Forward, hosted by Chrystia Freeland and featuring Reuters’ top commentators and journalists, including David Rohde, Reuters columnist, author and two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize; Rob Cox, US editor of Breakingviews; Bethany McLean, Reuters columnist, Vanity Fair contributor and author; David Cay Johnston, tax expert, author and Pulitzer Prize winner; Geraldine Fabrikant, Reuters columnist, senior writer for The New York Times and winner of the Loeb Award; Steven Brill, Reuters columnist, author and founder of the Yale Journalism Initiative; Ian Bremmer, President of the Eurasia Group; James Ledbetter, Reuters Op-ed editor and author;
  • Money Clip, with Lauren Young, personal finance editor and former editor at BusinessWeek and SmartMoney;
  • Rough Cuts, with Jen Rogers, showcasing the remarkable news video that Reuters video journalists shoot around the world, allowing viewers to see and hear that video in greater depth than most television networks can offer;
  • Decoder, explaining in succinct and surprising ways the key topics in the news, ranging from the debt ceiling to the Strait of Hormuz.

The programming will open with Chrystia Freeland’s exclusive interview with Mikhail Prokhorov, the Russian billionaire and sportsman who has made the controversial announcement that he is running for president in Russia, challenging Vladimir Putin.

Reuters.com gets at least 40 million unique visitors around the world monthly and is the fourth most trafficked business-news website. YouTube gets more than 3 billion hits per day.

214 Notes

thedailywhat:

Truth Vigilante of the Day: Asks New York Times public editor Arthur S. Brisbane: Should the Times “challenge ‘facts’ that are asserted by newsmakers they write about”?
“Duh doy,” answers everyone. (Some more poignantly than others.)
But Brisbane claims readers who are rushing to capitalize every letter in the word “yes” are missing his point.
“Of course, The Times should print the truth, when it can be found, and fact-check,” he tells Romenesko. “I was also hoping to stimulate a discussion about the difficulty of selecting which ‘facts’ to rebut, facts being troublesome things that seem to shift depending on the beholder’s perspective.”
Fair enough. So how about we start by rebutting the “facts” that are wrong based on the fact that they’re not right and work our way down from there.
[nytimes.]

thedailywhat:

Truth Vigilante of the Day: Asks New York Times public editor Arthur S. Brisbane: Should the Timeschallenge ‘facts’ that are asserted by newsmakers they write about”?

“Duh doy,” answers everyone. (Some more poignantly than others.)

But Brisbane claims readers who are rushing to capitalize every letter in the word “yes” are missing his point.

“Of course, The Times should print the truth, when it can be found, and fact-check,” he tells Romenesko. “I was also hoping to stimulate a discussion about the difficulty of selecting which ‘facts’ to rebut, facts being troublesome things that seem to shift depending on the beholder’s perspective.”

Fair enough. So how about we start by rebutting the “facts” that are wrong based on the fact that they’re not right and work our way down from there.

[nytimes.]